“Secret” languages or slangs

Estas dos personas ilustran el verbo "to razz" en ingles, una manera de abuchear o expresar desprecio. El origen de esa palabra está en la jerga rimada del Este de Londres, la llamada "rhyming slang".

These two individuals illustrate the verb “to razz,” which has its origins in Cockney rhyming slang and is indirectly connected with the word “fart.”

Enlace para español/Link here for Spanish

Dear reader,

The idea of a secret or encoded language is ancient, with obvious appeal to teenagers, colleagues in an occupation, prisoners—any group, really, that feels the need or desire to exclude outsiders from its communication.

In English, children have Pig Latin, where the first sound is moved to the end of the word, followed by ‘ay’: thus “ellohay” = hello. It’s similar to jeringoso, jerigonso o jerigonza (all derived from Span. jerga, Engl. “jargon”), which is a bit more complex: after each syllable comes ‘p’ and the vowel repeated, thus hopolapa = hola (hello), sipi = (yes), grapaciapas = gracias (thanks).

El vesre (the word revés, or reverse, itself reversed) long popular in Argentina and Uruguay inverts the order of syllables, though sometimes only approximately: yobaca = caballo (horse), jermu = mujer (woman), viorsi = servicio (bathroom), dolape = pelado (bald-headed man), lompa = pantalón (pants),  tidorpa = partido (game or match). When some action turns out to be useless, it’s common to hear vesre used in saying “fue al dope” (the phrase al pedo means useless, in vain; pedo itself means “fart” and thus the original sense of the phrase may well have been “as useless as a fart” or “like a fart in the wind”).

Victorian English back-slang was similar, though it inverted words letter-by-letter, rather than by syllable: “evig ti ot em” = give it to me. Apparently it was much used by shop clerks and street vendors to deceive customers.

Rhyming slang, a Cockney (East End of London) art, is great fun. Just a few examples: “slabs of meat” = feet, “trouble and strife” = wife. “Lee Marvin” = starvin’, “apples and pairs” = stairs, “bread and honey” = money. Often, further concealing the actual word intended, only the first part of the phrase is used, thus “I fell down the apples and broke me hand” = I fell down the stairs and broke my hand. So in rhyming slang, the rhyme is often implicit.

The verb to razz has its own amusing origin in rhyming slang. It means to jeer by using tongue and lips to imitate the sound of flatulence—and comes from “raspberry tart,” which is rhyming slang for “fart.” In the US, the same sound is also called a “Bronx cheer” (see illustration above).

Though none of these “languages” is hard to decode on paper, it’s not hard to imagine that when spoken at high speed they can be quite effective for secret communication. Quite apart from that use, these kinds of word play appeal to many users of language simply because they are fun and offer an arena for verbal creativity.

Good words! … ¡Buenas palabras!

Pablo

Copyright ©2014 by Pablo J. Davis. All rights reserved.

Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT,  is an ATA Certified Translator (Engl>Span) and a Supreme Court of Tennessee Certified Interpreter (Engl<>Span). An earlier version of this essay was originally published in the Mar. 2-8, 2014 edition of  La Prensa Latina, Memphis, Tennessee, as part of the weekly bilingual column “Mysteries & Enigmas of Translation/Misterios y Enigmas de la Traducción.”

Jergas o lenguajes “secretos”

Link here for English/enlace para inglés

Querida lectora o lector:

La idea de un lenguaje secreto o encifrado es antigua, y muy cotizada entre adolescentes, colegas de oficio, presidiarios—cualquier grupo que sienta la necesidad o deseo de excluir de su comunicación a los de afuera.

Estas dos personas ilustran el verbo "to razz" en ingles, una manera de abuchear o expresar desprecio. El origen de esa palabra está en la jerga rimada del Este de Londres, la llamada "rhyming slang".

Estas dos personas ilustran el verbo “to razz” en ingles, una manera de abuchear o expresar desprecio. El origen de esa palabra está en la jerga rimada del Este de Londres, la llamada “rhyming slang”.

En inglés, el Pig Latin (latín de cerdos) infantil corre el primer sonido de la palabra al final, seguida de ‘ay’ (suena ‘ei’): ellohay = hello (hola). Es como el “jeringoso” o  “jerigonso/a” (voces derivada de “jerga”, ingl.  jargon) en español: en este juego, más complejo, tras cada sílaba se intercala ‘p’ más la repetición de la vocal de esa sílaba: “hopolapa” = hola, “sipi” = sí, “grapaciapas” = gracias.

Una jerga muy popular en la región del Río de la Plata (Argentina y Uruguay) es el “vesre” o “vesrre” (jerga al revés, cuyo nombre no es otra cosa que la palabra “revés” al revés). En el vesre, se invierte el orden de las sílabas, aunque no siempre con precisión matemática: “yobaca” (caballo), “jermu” (mujer), “viorsi” (servicio, o cuarto de baño), “dolape” (pelado, o calvo), “lompa” (pantalón), “tidorpa” (partido). Cuando se hace algo inútilmente, se usa el vesre para decir que fue “al dope” (“al pedo” en lenguaje coloquial rioplatense significa inútil, en vano).

Algo parecido se hacía con el back slang de la Inglaterra victoriana,  en que se invertía las palabras, no por sílabas, sino letra por letra: evig ti ot em = give it to me (dámelo). Al parecer era muy usado por compañeros de trabajo en puestos callejeros y comercios para engañar a clientes.

Una jerga sumamente creativa y divertida es el rhyming slang (jerga rimada) cockney, o sea, con su origen en los barrios populares del Este londinense. Slabs of meat (cachos de carne) = feet (pies), trouble and strife (desdichas y querellas) = wife (esposa), Lee Marvin = starvin’ (hambriento), apples and pears = stairs (escaleras), bread and honey = money (dinero). Often rhyming slang shortens the encoded phrase so that the rhyme is implicit, for instance: “I fell down the apples and broke me hand” = I fell down the stairs and broke my hand (me caí por la escalera y me quebré la mano).

El verbo to razz, que significa abuchear sacando la lengua a medias y soplando por entre los labios semicerrados, imitando el sonido de una flatulencia, tiene un origen comiquísimo en la jerga rimada cockney: proviene de raspberry tart (tarta de frambuesa), que rima con fart (pedo).  En EEUU ese ruido también se llama Bronx cheer (aplauso del Bronx). Las fotografías arriba muestran a dos individuos en pleno razzing.

Si bien es cierto que ninguno de estos “lenguajes” es difícil de descifrar en el papel, hablados a gran velocidad pueden ser bastante eficaces para comunicar secretos. Pero al margen de su uso confidencial está el simple disfrute que le da a muchas personas este tipo de juegos de lenguaje: su aspecto “lúdico”.

Copyright ©2014 by Pablo J. Davis. All rights reserved.

Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT es Traductor Certificado por la American Translators Association (Asociación Norteamericana de Traductores) ing>esp, e Intérprete Certificado por la Suprema Corte de Tennessee ing<>esp. Una versión anterior de este ensayo fue publicado originalmente por La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee) en su edición del 2 al 8 de marzo. 2014, como parte de la columna bilingüe semanal ‘Misterios y Enigmas de la Traducción’/Mysteries & Enigmas of Translation.

Happy New Year, Feliz Año Nuevo…!

Click here for Spanish/Enlace para español

January antique almanac

Dear reader,

This is the greeting of the moment, which in Spanish can be expressed several ways: “¡Feliz Año Nuevo!” (Happy New Year), “¡Feliz Año!” (Happy Year), or “¡Próspero Año Nuevo!” (Prosperous New Year).

New Year’s Eve is la Nochevieja in Spanish: literally ‘the old night’.

January (Spanish enero, not capitalized) is named for Janus, the Greek god of doors, who had one face looking backwards and another forward. As most of us do at this time of year: New Year’s resolutions (Spanish resoluciones de año nuevo) appear to date back to Roman times. Breaking them is likely just as old.

The year hasn’t always started in January. Among other dates, that honor fell for many centuries to March 25, in the early springtime of the Northern Hemisphere. January 1 replaced it when the Gregorian calendar was adopted (in 1582 in Catholic countries, later elsewhere, including 1752 in England).

For dates from Jan. 1 through Mar. 24 of the years around the time of the changeover, one often sees O.S. (Old Style) or N.S. (New Style) following the date, meant as a clarification: in the Old Style, the year changed not on Jan. 1 but on Mar. 25. So, for instance, Mar. 14, 1753 O.S. would be Mar. 14, 1754 N.S.

In the French Republican calendar, after the Revolution, the year started on our Sep. 22.

The fiscal year, depending on the country, begins the first of January, April, July, or October. The school year starts in March in the Southern Hemisphere, traditionally in September in the North (though now, schoolchildren glumly face an ever earlier start, as early as the first week of August!).

Other New Years are not fixed: this year the Jewish New Year will be Sep. 24-26; the Islamic, Oct. 24-25; and the Chinese, Jan. 31.

Even birthdays can be considered, and many people do think of them this way, as the beginning of a personal new year.

In truth, every year brings many New Years. May each and every one of them, in the course of 2014, bring health and prosperity, dear reader, to you and yours.

¡Buenas palabras… Good words!

Pablo

Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT,  is an ATA Certified Translator (Engl>Span) and a Supreme Court of Tennessee Certified Interpreter (Engl<>Span). An earlier version of this essay was originally published in the Dec. 30, 2013-Jan. 5, 2014 edition of  La Prensa Latina, Memphis, Tennessee, as part of the weekly bilingual column “Mysteries & Enigmas of Translation”/Misterios y Enigmas de la Traducción.

Feliz Año Nuevo, Happy New Year…

Click here for English/Enlace para inglés

Querida lectora o lector,

Está a la orden del día este saludo, junto a “¡Feliz Año!” y “¡Próspero Año Nuevo!”

En inglés, por lo general, se dice “Happy New Year!”, sin variantes.

La Nochevieja se llama New Year’s Eve en inglés: víspera de Año Nuevo.January antique almanac

El nombre de enero (January en inglés, con mayúscula) es por Jano, dios griego de las puertas, con una cara mirando hacia atrás y otra adelante. Como solemos hacer a principios de año: las resoluciones de año nuevo (New Year’s resolutions en inglés) parecen remontarse a la era romana. Es de suponer que su incumplimiento es de similar antigüedad.

El año no siempre comenzó en enero. Entre otras fechas, este honor le tocó por largos siglos al 25 de marzo, comienzos de la primavera en el Hemisferio Norte. Fue remplazado por el 1º de enero al adoptarse el calendario gregoriano (en 1582 en los países católicos, más tarde en otras partes, como 1752 en Inglaterra).

Para fechas en años cercanos al cambio, es frecuente encontrar la leyenda ‘Estilo Viejo’ (calendario juliano) o ‘Estilo Nuevo’ (gregoriano). De hecho, en documentos de mediados del siglo XVIII en lengua inglesa, se usan ‘O.S.’ (Old Style) y ‘N.S.’ (New Style) a modo de aclaración. Por ejemplo, la fecha “Mar. 15, 1753 O.S.” sería igual a “Mar. 15, 1754 N.S.” ya que en el sistema antiguo, el año cambiaba no el primero de enero sino el 25 de marzo.

En el calendario republicano francés tras la Revolución, la fecha que iniciaba el año era nuestro 22 de septiembre.

El comienzo del año (o ejercicio) fiscal, según el país, puede ser  1º de enero, abril, julio u octubre. El escolar, en marzo en el Hemisferio Sur, tradicionalmente en septiembre en el Norte (para tristeza de la juventud, arranca cada vez más temprano,  ¡hasta a principios de agosto!).

Movedizos son el Año Nuevo judío (este año 24-26 septiembre), islámico (este año 24-25 octubre) y chino (este año 31 enero).

Incluso los cumpleaños pueden considerarse, y de hecho son pensados así por muchas personas, como el comienzo de un nuevo año en lo personal.

Así es: cada año hay muchos Años Nuevos. Que todos y cada uno de ellos en el 2014 le traigan salud y prosperidad a usted y sus seres queridos.

Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT es Traductor Certificado por la American Translators Association (Asociación Norteamericana de Traductores) ing>esp, e Intérprete Certificado por la Suprema Corte de Tennessee ing<>esp. Una versión anterior de este ensayo fue publicado originalmente por La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee) en la edición del 30 dic. 2013 al 5 ene. 2014, como parte de la columna bilingüe semanal ‘Misterios y Enigmas de la Traducción’/Mysteries & Enigmas of Translation.

Is Día de Muertos/Day of the Dead a ‘Mexican Halloween’?

CLICK HERE FOR SPANISH/ENLACE PARA ESPAÑOL

by Pablo J. Davis

We’re in the brief interval between Halloween, widely celebrated in the US, and the festival known as ‘Día de los Muertos’ or ‘Día de Muertos’ and associated primarily with Mexico, though it’s observed in different ways throughout most of Latin America. It’s a good time to think about cultural similarities and differences.

La Calavera Catrina, genial creación del artista mexicano José Guadalupe Posada, ya tiene un siglo.

La Calavera de la Catrina, the brilliant creation of Mexican artist José Guadalupe Posada, has been the icon of El Día de Muertos for a century now.

Read more of this post

Halloween y Día de Muertos: miedo y comunión

ENLACE PARA INGLES/CLICK HERE FOR ENGLISH

por Pablo J. Davis

Nos encontramos en el brevísimo intervalo entre el gran festejo norteamericano de Halloween (31 octubre), y el Día de Muertos (1 y 2 noviembre) asociado primordialmente con México, aunque celebrado en diversos países latinoamericanos. Es buen momento para reflexionar sobre cultura, sobre similitudes y diferencias.

La Calavera Catrina, genial creación del artista mexicano José Guadalupe Posada, ya lleva un siglo como el ícono por excelencia del Día de Muertos.

La Calavera Catrina, genial creación del artista mexicano José Guadalupe Posada, ya lleva un siglo como el ícono por excelencia del Día de Muertos.

Es común la creencia, en Estados Unidos, de que el Día de Muertos es esencialmente “el Halloween mexicano”. Pero, ¿será cierto? Al igual que la palabra ‘amigo’ en español y friend en inglés, que se ubican una al lado de la otra en los diccionarios bilingües y sin embargo se refieren a realidades bastante distintas (lo mismo podría decirse de familia/family, fiesta/party y sinnúmero de otras duplas culturalmente significativas), Halloween y Día de Muertos comparten algunos símbolos y la misma época del año pero constituyen fenómenos culturales bien diferenciados. Read more of this post

Herencia hispana: por qué importa el español

La Mezquita, or Cathedral-Mosque of Córdoba, southern Spain, is considered one of the treasures of humanity and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Its majestic geometry embodies the encounter of Africa, Europe, and Asia that unfolded in complex ways in medieval Spain and helped shape the modern Spanish language.

La Mezquita y Catedral de Córdoba, en el Sur de España, se considera uno de los tesoros de la cultura humana y está entre los sitios de Patrimonio Mundial de la UNESCO. En su majestuosa geometría, logra plasmar el complejo encuentro de Áfria, Europa y Asia que se fue desarrollando a lo largo del Medioevo ibérico, y que influyó profundamente en la evolución de la lengua española moderna.

Click here for English/Enlace para inglés

Es fuerte el predominio del español entre las lenguas extranjeras en Estados Unidos. Lo estudiaban 865,000 universitarios en el 2009; lo seguían el francés (216,000) y el alemán (96,000). El español convoca a más alumnos que todas las demás lenguas extranjeras juntas. En los grados K-12 (para usar el término norteamericano) de las escuelas públicas, las cifras son aun más abrumadoras: en 2007-08, 6.4 millones de alumnos cursaban español (el 72% de todos los estudiantes de lenguas extranjeras) al lado de apenas 1.3 millones para el francés en el segundo puesto.

¿Por qué se estudia tanto “la lengua de Cervantes” en EE.UU., si bien no siempre con un éxito rotundo? A continuación, algunas de las motivaciones más comunes:

Una población grande y creciente. La población hispanohablante de EE.UU., más de 40 millones, sobrepasa a las de la casi totalidad de los países hispanos. Para muchos norteamericanos, las cifras del Censo de por sí demuestran la importancia del español y subrayan la conveniencia de aprenderlo. Por no hablar de la geografía, que ubica al país hispano más poblado del planeta en la frontera sur de EE.UU. y millones de hispanohablantes más en las Antillas, a poca distancia de las costas de la Florida.

Servicio comunitario.  Gran número de jóvenes de nobles ideales buscan aprender el español para poder desarrollar actividades de servicio a la comunidad inmigrante, en áreas tales como alfabetización, salud, asesoramiento legal y educación, o bien en misiones de fe religiosa. A su vez, estas interacciones devienen en muchos casos un vehículo para el “aprendizaje en servicio”, donde lo aprendido en el salón de clases se somete a la enriquecedora prueba de la experiencia real.

¿Lengua “fácil”?  La percepción del español como de fácil aprendizaje está muy difundida. De hecho, los universitarios norteamericanos típicamente lo ven como el modo más accessible de llenar el requisito de lengua extranjera de su institución. Es una verdad a medias: indudablemente, el español es una maravilla de consistencia gramatical y fonética, debido en gran medida a la Gramática de Nebrija (año 1492), una de las más tempranas para cualquier idioma moderno, como asimismo la fundación en 1713 de la Real Academia Española. Pero alcanzar un verdadero dominio de la lengua, ni remotamente puede considerarse tarea fácil.

¿Una lengua “cómica”? La frecuente fascinación con el llamado “Spanglish” —la incorporación de palabras y estructuras del ingles en el habla inmigrante— interpreta como cosa rara un fenómeno completamente natural cuando entran en contacto poblaciones con diferentes idiomas. Es un recurso lingüístico, no un dialecto ni mucho menos un idioma propio. El fenómeno inverso, bastante distinto, es el llamado “Faux Spanish” (falso español) entre angloparlantes: con frases como “no problemo” (no hay problema), “perfectamundo” (perfecto, perfectamente), “mucho macho” (muy macho, machote o hasta machista) y “el grande jefe” (gran jefe), transmite una actitud entre juguetona y burlona hacia el español y quienes lo hablan.

Lengua de trabajadores e inmigrantes. Muchos norteamericanos asocian el español con inmigrantes pobres, en muchos casos indocumentados  —percepción comprensible a la luz de las obsesiones mediáticas y políticas en la actualidad, y tal vez de la experiencia directa de muchas personas. Desde esta perspectiva, la utilidad del idioma pasa por la comunicación con los trabajadores, o por su supervisión en el lugar de trabajo. ¡Pero no se trataría en todo caso de un idioma “serio”, absurda noción expresada no hace mucho tiempo atrás por una prestigiosa escuela privada de Virginia que en su sitio web se jactaba de ofrecer, por razones de “rigor academic”, solamente francés! Una premisa similar animaba al juez que, en sonado caso de agosto de 1995 en un juzgado de familia de Amarillo, Texas, ordenó a una inmigrante mexicana que dejase de hablar con su hija de cinco años en español, lengua cuyo uso constituía “abuso infantil” y que condenaría a la niña a un futuro “de sirvienta”. (Tanto la escuela como el juez dieron marcha atrás posteriormente, tras sufrir sendas avalanchas de críticas públicas.)

Una cultura “pintoresca”.  En Estados Unidos, es común oir expresiones de fascinación por la cultura hispana, pasando éstas muchas veces por la salsa (cocina) y la salsa (música y danza). Sin lugar a dudas, hay muchísimo interés sincero. A la vez, con adjetivos como “colorido”, “pintoresco”, “simple” y “exótico” se pinta un mundo hispano de campesinos, de vida rural y pueblerina, de una vida sumergida en “la tradición”. Esta perspectiva puede, sin querer, terminar por situar a los hispanos o latinos en un pasado primitivo, incluso fuera del tiempo. En otra perspectiva común, el español es visto como lengua de lugares adonde van muchos universitarios durante el receso de primavera, y otros turistas, a hacer “vida loca”. Se trata, en muchos casos, de lugares que, en un pasado, Estados Unidos conquistó, ocupó o dominó. De hecho, es ésta la otra cara de la moneda de “la lengua de trabajadores ilegales”. Una larga historia de relaciones de poder  ha sembrado hábitos de pensamiento fuertemente arraigados.

*    *    *

¡Tamaña mezcla de razones y motivaciones (y es sólo un muestreo)! Aquí hay una sincera inquietud por conocer otras culturas,  el llamado al servicio, la fe y el amor a la justicia. Al mismo tiempo, nos topamos en cierta medida con la romantización simplona, la condescendencia y agendas del poder.

Hay otras razones para estudiar y buscar profundizar el dominio del español, factores clave de su importancia de la lengua y de su aprendizaje, en estos comienzos del siglo 21.

Una lengua global. El español ya ocupa el segundo puesto entre los idiomas del mundo, de acuerdo al número de hablantes nativos, excedido sólo por el chino mandarin. Más de 410 millones de personas (más de 1 de cada 20 seres humanos) lo tienen como primer idioma, más que el inglés que ocupa el tercer puesto con unos 360 millones —aunque el inglés salta adelante del español si se cuenta a aquellos que lo hablan como segundo idioma. El portugués (al que me gusta llamar la lengua “melliza” del español, proximidad que el inglés no goza con ninguna lengua viva) tiene más de 220 millones de hablantes nativos, en su mayoría en la ascendente potencia que es el Brasil. Los hispanohablantes comprenden en buen grado el portugués y de por sí cuentan con un “envión” natural al abordar su aprendizaje.

Potencia económica. Los 53 millones de hispanos en EE.UU. (¡1 de cada 6 personas!) gastan unos $1.3 trillones (o sea millones de millones) anualmente y el producto bruto interno (PBI) de los países hispanos es de $3.4 trillones, igual a la potencia industrial que es Alemania. Si incluimos a la república hermana del Brasil, la cifra asciende a $5.9 trillones, a la par de Japón. Hay incontables mercados en que vender, trabajos a desempeñar, textos a traducir por personas que tengan un buen dominio del idioma (dominio, a fin de cuentas, inseparable de la comprensión cultural).

Una civilización mundial. Los idiomas encarnan la experiencia y creatividad de los pueblos. En el caso del español, esto abarca desde los antiguados legados íbero, celta, romano y germánico, además de la singular presencia rom o gitana (la palabra, derivada de “egiptano”, voz que da cuenta del paso de una porción de esa etnia errante por el Norte de África, por vía Egipto); casi un milenio de coexistencia cristiano-judío-musulmana; el primer imperio global de la historia; y, hoy, veinte sociedades multiculturales de herencia indígena, africana, europea y asiática. Como botoncito de muestra de la riqueza cultural plasmada en el español, consideremos cómo, en sociedades de fuerte mayoría cristiana, se expresa un deseo con la voz Ojalá, derivada del árabe (Inshallah).

El Caballero de la Triste Figura. El Quixote de Cervantes probablemente sea la obra de ficción más conocida y amada del mundo entero. Corona a una literatura que incluye la brillante poeta mexicana del siglo 17, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz; ese maestro absoluto del estilo moderno, José Martí, caído en combate por la independencia de Cuba; el amado poeta chileno, Pablo Neruda; el argentino Jorge Luis Borges con sus misterios metafísicos; y los grandes relatores de nuestros tiempos, entre ellos el colombiano Garcia Marquez, el peruano Vargas Llosa, el mexicano Carlos Fuentes, la chilena Isabel Allende y Julia Álvarez d la República Dominicana.

La recuperación de la propia herencia.  Para una considerable proporción de los hispanos nacidos, o al menos criados, en EE.UU., el inglés es su lengua dominante o posiblemente único (nótese la diferencia entre las cifras de población hispana, 53 millones, y población hispanoparlante, 40 millones). Para aquellos expuestos al español en la infancia, sobre todo en el hogar (los docentes de lenguas los llaman estudiantes “de herencia”), aprender el idioma puede constituir una poderosa experiencia de recuperación de un patrimonio cultural y familiar.

Una vision de la vida.  Llegar a dominar el español es aprender otra manera de estar en el mundo, una peculiar combinación de seriedad, humor, jerarquía y dignidad. El angloparlante que lo hace, aprende a dejar de lado ese ubicuo pronombre imperial de “I” (¡único pronombre que lleva mayúscula en inglés!), adoptando en su lugar el yo, usado con mucha más moderación: el español reviste cierta modestia.  Uno aprende palabras para relaciones y costumbres que el inglés no puede nombrar: comadre y compadre para quienes apadrinan el hijo de uno, o a la inversa, tocayo para quien comparte el mismo nombre, sobremesa para ese largo y placentero rato que se pasa en la mesa conversando después de la comida. Al decir “Hasta mañana”, se agrega en muchos casos “si Dios quiere”: pequeña pero significativa reverencia lingüística ante la Deidad, o simplemente las incógnitas del porvenir.

Hay muchas rázones validas para estudiar español. Puede ser parte de la preparación para vacaciones en Cancún, o para mejor el funcionamiento de la oficina de recursos humanos de una compañía, o mil cosas más. Pero reconocer en el español una pujante fuerza económica global, una literatura que se sitúa entre las grandes del mundo y un camino a la verdadera fluidez intercultural ofrecen otras razones para estudiarlo, razones que expanden la mente y cambian la vida.

Copyright ©2013 by Pablo J. Davis. All Rights Reserved. Se reservan todos los derechos.

Se publicó una versión de este artículo en The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN) el viernes 27 de septiembre de 2013. Pablo J. Davis hizo sus estudios de pos-grado en Historia de América Latina en las universidades de Columbia y Johns Hopkins. Es traductor e intérprete profesionalmente certificado con larga experiencia, y especializado en traducción e interpretación legal; ofrece además entrenamiento en esos campos y en destrezas interculturales (www.interfluency.com).


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: