Word of a thousand disguises: the long, strange career of “freak”

Enlace para español/Link here for Spanish

Dear reader,

Words change across years and generations. They change spelling, sound, and especially meaning. But some follow such long and winding paths, so full of surprises, it can be incredible. One of these is the English word “freak.”

Circus poster photo, Ala., Walker Evans [1935] [AmMemory LOC id- fsa1998017988(slash)PP]

A key association of “freak” is with the circus, where it meant a person displayed due to some unusual (even hideous) characteristic such as extreme height, extra fingers, etc. This photo of a circus poster was taken in Alabama in 1935 by Walker Evans. (Source: Library of Congress, American Memory website)

Brave, fierce warrior.  From Old English, this sense dates to A.D. 900 or before.

Sudden fancy, whim.  This use was well established by the early 19th century. “A sudden freak seemed to have seized him” (Jane Austen). Spanish equivalents: capricho, locura. Not much used anymore. But freak out is—meaning a highly nervous or irrational reaction to a situation: “I need you to stay calm—don’t freak out on me.”

Enthusiast.  From the sense of “whim” arose that of “enthusiast.” It’s still common to hear, “She’s a health freak.” Spanish: Es una maniática de la salud.

Abnormal or extreme specimen. From “whim” came, too, the idea of the abnormal. A very tall person could be called “a freak” or “a freak of nature.” Around 1920 the term “circus freak” began to grow in use. It referred to an unfortunate person or animal fated to be exhibited in a circus, fair, or carnival. Spanish has fenómeno del circo. Typical attractions might be “The Bearded Lady” or “The Two-Headed Calf.”

Unusual, odd, rare. Similar to the previous sense, but distinct, is this broader one: as an adjective, “freak” can simply mean “unusual, odd, rare.” For instance, “a freak early-summer snowstorm” or “a freak occurrence.”

Drug user. In the 1960s and 1970s, it was commonplace to hear “freak” for an enthusiastic drug user, usually of marijuana or LSD.  It was also associated, in men, with beards and long hair. The combination “hippie freak” was common. An underground comic of the era was The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers.

Nymphomaniac, hypersexual person. The drug-related sense began to give way to a new one. Rick James used it when he famously sang, “Super freak, the girl’s a super freak!” The meaning is that an individual is presumably insatiable in the sexual realm. Spanish has ninfómana and many slang terms, including loca (the feminine form of the adjective for “crazy”), much used in Argentina and Uruguay.

Copyright ©2016 by Pablo J. Davis.  All Rights Reserved. An earlier version of this essay originally appeared in the May 8-14, 2016 edition of La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee) as number 179 in the weekly bilingual column, “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT is an ATA (American Translators Association) Certified Translator, Engl>Span; a Tennessee State Courts Certified Interpreter, Engl<>Span; and an innovative trainer in the fields of translation, interpreting, and intercultural competency, with over 25 years experience. He holds the doctorate in Latin American History from The Johns Hopkins University, and is a Juris Doctor Candidate at the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, University of Memphis (May 2017).

Advertisements

Of masks, minds, sinners, and the word “person”

Enlace para español/Click here for Spanish

Dear reader,

What is it you and I, and everyone we know, are all examples of? So many words for it: “individuals,” “human beings,” just plain “humans,” “persons,” to name just a few. These are plurals; in the singular, each of us is an “individual,” a “human being,” or simply a “human,” or a “person.”  That last word may be the most common of all.persona máscara classic mask

“Person” has an interesting history: it comes from Latin persona, with a root sense of “to sound through”—the reference is to an actor’s mask, possibly with some means of voice amplification, as with a horn. Persona, then, came to mean “role” or “character,” gradually acquiring the further sense of “person, individual.” Engl. “persona” (with the “a” hanging on at the end just like in Latin) still means an assumed role or personality.

Persona’s descendants are found throughout the Romance languages (Sp.. It. persona, Fr. personne which can also mean “nobody,” Port. pessoa, etc.), but also Ger. Person, Swed. person, and many others.

The Slavic languages use a wholly different word: Rus. chelovek (pronounced “chel-a-VYEK”) appears to derive from words for “mind, thought” and “time, eternity”—thus the word for “person” would mean something like “eternal mind,” a lovely and spiritual sense Plato no doubt would have savored. (Engl. “man” seems, likewise, cognate with “mind” and originally meant any human being.)

Depending on the context, a whole series of terms can be more or less equivalent to “person”: “citizen,”  “subject”, “taxpayer,” “voter,” “resident,” and “consumer,” to name just a few. Of course their connotations differ pretty dramatically. There is an assertion of rights implicit in “citizen” that’s not quite there in “consumer,” though the latter has legal rights too.

Then there is “souls” with all its mystery and sometimes pathos—think of a phrase like “the 1,517 souls that perished on the R.M.S. Titanic.”

A curious and fascinating word for “person” is pikadur in Guinea-Bissau Crioulo, a tongue with a strong Portuguese core plus West African elements. Pikadur is from Port. pecador (sinner). Pecado (sin) is related to the second syllable in “impeach” which originally meant “to find fault, to find sin.”  In this word for “person,” the hand of the Christian missionary is not hard to see!

Theology meets language: in Crioulo you may mean “person” but you’re saying “sinner”!

¡Buenas palabras! Good words!

Pablo

Copyright ©2016 by Pablo J. Davis.  All Rights Reserved. An earlier version of this essay originally appeared in the Jul. 8-14, 2016 edition of La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee) as number 188 in the weekly bilingual column, “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT is an ATA (American Translators Association) Certified Translator, Engl>Span; a Tennessee State Courts Certified Interpreter, Engl<>Span; and an innovative trainer in the fields of translation, interpreting, and intercultural competency, with over 25 years experience. He holds the doctorate in Latin American History from The Johns Hopkins University, and is a Juris Doctor Candidate at the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, University of Memphis (May 2017).

El Día de los Tontos… y la inocencia

Click here for English/Enlace para inglés

Querida lectora o lector,

No es un feriado, los escolares no tienen el día libre, no hay grandes ofertas en las tiendas—pero el primero de abril es una fecha muy celebrada.

Free iPad visual!April Fool’s Day (Día de los Tontos de Abril) es ocasión para tratar de engañar a compañeros, amigos o familiares con cuentos absurdos. Y si caen, se les canta “April Fool!” (¡Tonto de abril!). (Los franceses dicen “Poisson d’avril” y los italianos “Pesce d’aprile!” o sea, en efecto “Pescado de abril”.)

Las bromas del primero de abril pueden ser impresas también: muchos periódicos tenían la tradición de imprimir una primera plana falsa, antes de la verdadera, llena de noticias ficticias y absurdas. Algunos aun lo hacen.

Eso sí: la actual campaña electoral en EEUU ha hecho que sea difícil imaginar noticias falsas más absurdas que las reales.

En el mundo hispano, sobre todo en las poblaciones en mayor contacto con la cultura norteamericana, ha crecido hasta cierto punto la observación del primero de abril como “Día de los Tontos”.

Pero el día equivalente real es el 28 de diciembre, Día de los Santos Inocentes. La fecha tiene un origen terrible: la bíblica masacre de infantes bajo órdenes del Rey Herodes, que esperaba que se encontrase entre los bebés muertos el Niño Jesús.

De esos trágicos inocentes, a las inocentes víctimas de las creativas mentiras del 28 de diciembre, hay largo trecho. Pero así la cultura popular adaptó y transformó aquella conmemoración.

Cuando alguien cae en una broma de los Santos Inocentes, se le dice “¡Que la inocencia te valga!”

Para redondear con temas más serios, ¿sabía usted que Trump y Sanders han formado una “fórmula de unidad nacional”? Y que Apple está conmemorando el aniversario de Steve Jobs regalando iPads gratis, si uno escribe a free-ipads@apple.com? April Fool!

 ¡Buenas palabras! Good words!

Pablo

Una anterior versión de este ensayo apareció originalmente en la edición del 25 al 31 de marzo 2016 de La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee), como la entrega número 174 de la columna semanal bilingüe “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT es Traductor Certificado por la ATA (American Translators Association), inglés>español, e Intérprete Certificado por los Tribunales del Estado de Tennessee inglés<>español, además de entrenador en los campos de la traducción, interpretación y competencia transcultural. Es doctor en Historia de América Latina por la Universidad de Johns Hopkins, y actualmente candidato al Juris Doctor en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Memphis (mayo 2017).

Luna y lengua

Link here for English/Enlace para inglés

Esta última semana trajo no solamente luna llena (o, agraciadamente, “plenilunio”), ingl. full moon, sino también un eclipse lunar penumbral.  La mayoría estamos muy alejados del campo, y del otrora hechizo ejercido por el cielo nocturno… pero nuestra compañera celestial no ha perdido el poder de abrumarnos con su belleza.

Las lenguas humanas dan fe de la huella profunda dejada por nuestro único satélite natural. En estas líneas, echaremos un breve vistazo a esa huella, a través de palabras y frases, en español e inglés principalmente.

penumbral lunar eclipse march 2016La casualidad de que Luna (Moon, en inglés) y Sol (Sun) tengan el mismo tamaño aparente en el cielo terrestrial, sin duda ha contribuido a que las culturas humanas los vean como pareja, encarnando dualidades como macho/hembra, oro/plata,  noche/día. La asociación luna-hembra es profunda: las fases lunares tienen su eco en el ciclo menstrual femenino.

El “lunes” (lundi, francés; lunedì, italiano) es su día; “Monday” en inglés (Montag, alemán). El “mes” (de mensis, latín), o month en inglés, también llevan su impronta.

Otro lazo: luna y locura. El loco es “lunático” (lunatic). En inglés coloquial se le dice looney (LU-ni) y looney bin (la caja de los locos) es un psiquiátrico.

En inglés, to moon es andar penando por un amor no correspondido (un uso algo arcáico), o enseñar las nalgas como burla o insulto.

“Lunar” por marca o mancha en la piel (birthmark en inglés) se debe a una antigua creencia en la influencia de la luna. En inglés, como no hay equivalente por alunizaje, se dice “Moon landing.”

El poder del “claro de luna” (moonlight) sobre los jóvenes amantes es archiconocido y los poetas y letristas han sido sus cómplices durante siglos.

La curiosa palabra “sublunar” significa “terrestre, mundano.” En un sermón del siglo 18, Samuel Johnson llama a quienes lo oigan a que “se despidan de las vanidades sublunares” y que en lugar de éstas, “con corazón puro y fe constante, teman a Dios y guarden sus mandamientos”.

Una anterior versión de este ensayo apareció originalmente en la edición del 27 de noviembre al 3 de diciembre de 2015 de La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee), como la entrega número 158 de la columna semanal bilingüe “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT es Traductor Certificado por la ATA (American Translators Association), inglés>español, e Intérprete Certificado por los Tribunales del Estado de Tennessee inglés<>español, además de entrenador en los campos de la traducción, interpretación y competencia transcultural. Es doctor en Historia de América Latina por la Universidad de Johns Hopkins, y actualmente candidato al Juris Doctor en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Memphis (mayo 2017).

Lunary language and lore

Enlace para español/Link for Spanish

Dear reader,

This past week brought not only a full moon (Span. luna llena, or, in a graceful Latin form, plenilunio), but also a penumbral lunar eclipse.  And as far removed as most of us city folk are from the country and the spell the night sky used to cast on humanity, our companion orb has not lost the power to stun us with its beauty.

Human language testifies to the profound imprint that Earth’s satellite has made on human consciousness. We’ll look very briefly at some of that testimony, mainly in English and Spanish.

penumbral lunar eclipse march 2016The odd chance that Sun (Sol) and Moon (Luna) appear the same size in the earthly sky, has surely reinforced human cultures’ seeing them as a pair representing male/female, gold/silver, night/day.  The moon-female tie runs deep: the lunar phases find an echo in woman’s menstrual cycle.

The moon has its day: Engl. “Monday” (Ger. Montag, Dan. mandag), Span. lunes (Fr. lundi, It. lunedì).  It also gives us “month”; Span. mes is from Lat.  mensis, a root visible in words like “bi-mensual.”

Another link: moon and madness, yields  Engl. “lunatic” and Span. Lunático.  But  English informalizes it with “looney” and “looney tunes” (from the old cartoon series); “looney bin” is a mental hospital.

English also uses “moon” for “to languish sadly” (as one pining for a lost or unrequited love), which is a slightly archaic usage, and “to show one’s bared buttocks,” which isn’t.

Sp. lunar (loo-NAR) is also “birthmark,” once thought caused by the Moon’s influence, or “polka dot” on clothing. Spanish calls a landing on the Moon an alunizaje (by analogy to aterrizaje on Earth).

“Moonlight” (Sp. claro de luna, Fr. claire de lune) has a power over young lovers, long understood (and abetted) by poets and songwriters.

Samuel Johnson’s Sermon XII movingly uses the lovely, archaic word “sublunary” for “earthly”—urging his listeners “to bid farewell to sublunary vanities” and instead “with pure heart and steady faith to ‘fear God and keep his commandments.’”

¡Buenas palabras! Good words!

Pablo

An earlier version of this essay originally appeared in the Nov. 27-Dec. 3, 2015 edition of La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee) as number 158 in the weekly bilingual column, “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT is an ATA (Aamerican Translators Association) Certified Translator, Engl>Span; a Tennessee State Courts Certified Interpreter, Engl<>Span; and an innovative trainer in the fields of translation, interpreting, and intercultural competency, with over 25 years experience. He holds the doctorate in Latin American History from The Johns Hopkins University, and is a Juris Doctor Candidate at the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, University of Memphis (May 2017).

Happy New Year, Feliz Año Nuevo…!

Click here for Spanish/Enlace para español

January antique almanac

Dear reader,

This is the greeting of the moment, which in Spanish can be expressed several ways: “¡Feliz Año Nuevo!” (Happy New Year), “¡Feliz Año!” (Happy Year), or “¡Próspero Año Nuevo!” (Prosperous New Year).

New Year’s Eve is la Nochevieja in Spanish: literally ‘the old night’.

January (Spanish enero, not capitalized) is named for Janus, the Roman god of doorways, who had one face looking backwards and another forward. As most of us do at this time of year: New Year’s resolutions (Spanish resoluciones de año nuevo) appear to date back to Roman times. Breaking them is likely just as old.

The year hasn’t always started in January. Among other dates, that honor fell for many centuries to March 25, in the early springtime of the Northern Hemisphere. January 1 replaced it when the Gregorian calendar was adopted (in 1582 in Catholic countries, later elsewhere, including 1752 in England).

For dates from Jan. 1 through Mar. 24 of the years around the time of the changeover, one often sees O.S. (Old Style) or N.S. (New Style) following the date, meant as a clarification: in the Old Style, the year changed not on Jan. 1 but on Mar. 25. So, for instance, Mar. 14, 1753 O.S. would be Mar. 14, 1754 N.S.

In the French Republican calendar, after the Revolution, the year started on our Sep. 22.

The fiscal year, depending on the country, begins the first of January, April, July, or October. The school year starts in March in the Southern Hemisphere, traditionally in September in the North (though now, schoolchildren glumly face an ever earlier start, as early as the first week of August!).

Other New Years are not fixed: this year the Jewish New Year will be Sep. 24-26; the Islamic, Oct. 24-25; and the Chinese, Jan. 31.

Even birthdays can be considered, and many people do think of them this way, as the beginning of a personal new year.

In truth, every year brings many New Years. May each and every one of them, in the course of 2014, bring health and prosperity, dear reader, to you and yours.

¡Buenas palabras… Good words!

Pablo

Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT,  is an ATA Certified Translator (Engl>Span) and a Supreme Court of Tennessee Certified Interpreter (Engl<>Span). An earlier version of this essay was originally published in the Dec. 30, 2013-Jan. 5, 2014 edition of  La Prensa Latina, Memphis, Tennessee, as part of the weekly bilingual column “Mysteries & Enigmas of Translation”/Misterios y Enigmas de la Traducción.

Feliz Año Nuevo, Happy New Year…

Click here for English/Enlace para inglés

Querida lectora o lector,

Está a la orden del día este saludo, junto a “¡Feliz Año!” y “¡Próspero Año Nuevo!”

En inglés, por lo general, se dice “Happy New Year!”, sin variantes.

La Nochevieja se llama New Year’s Eve en inglés: víspera de Año Nuevo.January antique almanac

El nombre de enero (January en inglés, con mayúscula) es por Jano, dios romano de las puertas, con una cara mirando hacia atrás y otra adelante. Como solemos hacer a principios de año: las resoluciones de año nuevo (New Year’s resolutions en inglés) parecen remontarse a la era romana. Es de suponer que su incumplimiento es de similar antigüedad.

El año no siempre comenzó en enero. Entre otras fechas, este honor le tocó por largos siglos al 25 de marzo, comienzos de la primavera en el Hemisferio Norte. Fue remplazado por el 1º de enero al adoptarse el calendario gregoriano (en 1582 en los países católicos, más tarde en otras partes, como 1752 en Inglaterra).

Para fechas en años cercanos al cambio, es frecuente encontrar la leyenda ‘Estilo Viejo’ (calendario juliano) o ‘Estilo Nuevo’ (gregoriano). De hecho, en documentos de mediados del siglo XVIII en lengua inglesa, se usan ‘O.S.’ (Old Style) y ‘N.S.’ (New Style) a modo de aclaración. Por ejemplo, la fecha “Mar. 15, 1753 O.S.” sería igual a “Mar. 15, 1754 N.S.” ya que en el sistema antiguo, el año cambiaba no el primero de enero sino el 25 de marzo.

En el calendario republicano francés tras la Revolución, la fecha que iniciaba el año era nuestro 22 de septiembre.

El comienzo del año (o ejercicio) fiscal, según el país, puede ser  1º de enero, abril, julio u octubre. El escolar, en marzo en el Hemisferio Sur, tradicionalmente en septiembre en el Norte (para tristeza de la juventud, arranca cada vez más temprano,  ¡hasta a principios de agosto!).

Movedizos son el Año Nuevo judío (este año 24-26 septiembre), islámico (este año 24-25 octubre) y chino (este año 31 enero).

Incluso los cumpleaños pueden considerarse, y de hecho son pensados así por muchas personas, como el comienzo de un nuevo año en lo personal.

Así es: cada año hay muchos Años Nuevos. Que todos y cada uno de ellos en el 2014 le traigan salud y prosperidad a usted y sus seres queridos.

Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT es Traductor Certificado por la American Translators Association (Asociación Norteamericana de Traductores) ing>esp, e Intérprete Certificado por la Suprema Corte de Tennessee ing<>esp. Una versión anterior de este ensayo fue publicado originalmente por La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee) en la edición del 30 dic. 2013 al 5 ene. 2014, como parte de la columna bilingüe semanal ‘Misterios y Enigmas de la Traducción’/Mysteries & Enigmas of Translation.

%d bloggers like this: