The handmade magic of “Cartonera” books: a feast for the eyes, a lift for the soul!

Memphis Cartonera: Cooperative Publishing, Art & Action
Exhibit at Rhodes College, Clough-Hanson Gallery
Opens Fri., Jan. 27, 2017 (5-7pm), through Mar. 18.
Artist-in-Residence: Nelson Gutiérrez

An extravaganza of color, lettering, images, and textures, these books want you to judge them by their covers. On a base of the plainest possible material—corrugated cardboard, repurposed from boxes and packaging—a delightful festival of creativity leaps out at the viewer.

Cartonera 8 tapas de libros 2017-01-26.png

What’s inside those covers? Some of the stories are original. Some are classics in the public domain. Some brim with illustrations, some are for coloring. The variations are endless. But the covers are all made of recycled cardboard, with hand-painted titles and artwork. Each one’s a personal statement—a true original.

Introducing the “Cartonera” (from the Spanish word for cardboard) phenomenon! This truly grassroots movement was born in Argentina during the early 2000’s economic crisis. Cartoneras are cooperative, neighborhood-based publishing ventures. They’ve spread throughout Latin America.

Now the movement has caught on here with the founding of “Memphis Cartonera” by Rhodes College students and local nonprofits. Dr. Elizabeth Pettinaroli, a Spanish literature and language professor at Rhodes who conducted field research on cartoneras in Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, and Paraguay, has coordinated these efforts and led the mobilization of community partners.

These partners have included Centro Cultural (Cartonera comics), Cazateatro Bilingual Theater (Cartonera for adults/kids), Danza Azteca Quetzalcoatl (Spanish/Nahua poetry workshop), Refugee Empowerment Program (kids afterschool program), Latino Memphis/Abriendo Puertas (high-schoolers workshop), Caritas Village (Cartonera photo books for afterschool reading program).

It’s about rethinking art and literature’s place in our lives, fostering creativity, literacy, and sustainability.

A chance to learn more, talk with participants, and enjoy viewing some of the creations so far will be at the opening of a two-month-long exhibit Fri., Jan. 27 (5-7pm) at Rhodes College’s Clough-Hanson Gallery.  Nelson Gutiérrez will be the artist-in-residence throughout the exhibit. For more about the opening and a series of other activities, including workshops and talks by artist Gutiérrez, an info session on zines, and other events, please visit https://www.facebook.com/events/754637584693600/

Further info: Dr. Elizabeth Pettinaroli, 901-843-3828, pettinarolie@rhodes.edu. Sponsored by Rhodes College.

memphis-cartonera-letras-2017-01-26

A case of falling

Enlace para español/Click here for Spanish

Dear reader,

“What goes up, must come down.” How often do we reflect on the profound wisdom contained in the six words of that hackneyed phrase (five in Spanish: Todo lo que sube, baja)?

caida-fall-sign-cartel-peligro-dangerIt turns out this most simple physical act—if indeed we can call what gravity does the “act” of the body that falls—permeates language in deep and unexpected ways.

“Chance” expresses luck, probability, risk, randomness, opportunity. It comes to us via French from Latin: cadentia was Vulgar Latin for “falling,” from the Latin verb cadere (Span. caer). We hear the cad- root in “cadence,” the rhythm or pulse of music, as with a walking or running pace, but also the way a musical composition or section resolves—how it “falls.” The same root yields “decadence” (Sp. decadencia) and “decay” (Sp. decaimiento is “a weakened or discouraged state”; in the sense of the breakdown or rotting of matter, the Spanish word would be descomposición).

Cadere’s participle form, casus (like “see” has the participle form “seen”), gives us “case”  (Span. caso), whose main sense is a situation requiring investigation and action (such as treatment in the medical realm, prosecution or defense in the legal). Span. acaso means “maybe, by chance.” Casus also gives “casual” for “unplanned, informal” (Spanish emphasizes randomness: casualmente is “by chance”). Another descendant of Lat. casus: war’s “casualties” for “killed and wounded,” though sometimes the term is understood to mean only those killed. More poetically, the casualties of war are expressed as “the fallen”—though, oddly, that phrase with its tone of nobility is generally not applied to civilian dead and wounded, who in most wars are more numerous.

That which happens to us, a bit archaically, “befalls” us. But this sense is alive and well in the latest iterations of language, though expressed differently: we speak of how an event “went down,” we wait and see “how things fall out” and hope they “fall into place.”  Span. cómo caen las fichas is something like “how the dice fall.” We “fall in” with friends, until we have a “falling out.” “Fall in” also means the incorporation of an individual or group,  such as soldiers, into a march, drill, or parade.

One “falls for” a trick; Spanish has caer en la trampa, “to fall into a trap.” Spanish, picturesquely, has caer como un chorlito, literally “to fall like a little bird.” But on figuring something out, on realizing the truth, uno cae en la cuenta—something like “to fall into awareness.”

Between entering the world at birth and our final fall (when one “drops dead,” cae muerto), the most dramatic event in most of our lives is that moment when we “fall in love” (Sp. enamorarse).

Once again we are face to face with the mysterious quality of the verb “to fall,” caer: it seems to name a voluntary action (like “to walk,” “to cook”), yet it really expresses the operation on a body of an exterior force—love, death, gravity.

It’s hard to fathom the importance of this notion to language and culture. In the Christian worldview, the original act of disobedience causes “the Fall” (la Caída) of Humanity into a state of sinfulness. Indeed, the Fall could be understood as the framework for all of human history.

¡Buenas palabras! Good words!

Pablo

Copyright ©2016 by Pablo J. Davis.  All Rights Reserved. An earlier version of this essay originally appeared in the Dec. 11-17, 2016 edition of La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee) as number 210 in the weekly bilingual column, “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT is an ATA (American Translators Association) Certified Translator, Engl>Span; a Tennessee State Courts Certified Interpreter, Engl<>Span; and an innovative trainer in the fields of translation, interpreting, and intercultural competency, with over 25 years experience. He holds the doctorate in Latin American History from The Johns Hopkins University, and is a Juris Doctor Candidate at the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, University of Memphis (May 2017).

El caso de la caída

Click here for English/Enlace para inglés

 Querida lectora o lector,

¨Todo lo que sube, baja”. Es un cliché nomás, algo que se dice–¡pero cuánta sabiduría encierran esas cinco palabras! (En inglés son seis: What goes up must come down.)

caida-fall-sign-cartel-peligro-dangerResulta que este acto tan sencillo (si podemos llamar “acto” a algo causado o impuesto por la gravedad) permea el lenguaje de modo profundo y a veces inesperado.

“Chance” (chance en inglés, que se pronuncia “chans”) expresa suerte, riesgo, azar, oportunidad. Por vía del francés nos llega desde el latín vulgar: cadentia, cuyo infinitivo cadere nos da “caer” (en inglés: fall, pronunciado “fol”, de origen germánico). En música, “cadencia” es el paso o ritmo (como el andar de una persona) pero también el modo en que una composición o sección de la misma se resuelve—cómo “cae”. De igual raíz proceden “decadencia” y “decaimiento”.

El participio de cadere, casus (como “hacer” tiene su participio “hecho”), nos da “caso” (ingl. case), una situación que require investigación y acción (tratamiento en el fuero médico; procesamiento o defensa en el legal). De casus también viene “acaso” (por “tal vez”) y “casual” (azaroso; en inglés, casual recoge el sentido de “informal” y no el de “azaroso”). En inglés los muertos y heridos (a veces se entiende sólo los muertos) en batalla son casualties, “los caídos”, o en un inglés poético, the fallen. Extrañamente, este término con su evocaciones de nobleza, tiende a restringirse a las bajas militares—a pesar de que los civiles muertos y heridas son más numerosos en la mayoría de las guerras.

Aquello que nos ocurre, en inglés poético, befalls us—nos “acaece.” Ese sentido sigue muy actual, sin embargo, aunque expresado de otra manera: en inglés se habla de how things went down (cómo resultaron o “cayeron” las cosas), se espera a ver how things fall out (cómo “caen las fichas”). Trabar amistad es fall in con amigos; la pelea entre amigos, falling out. Fall in se refiere, además, a la incorporación de una o más personas, soldados por ejemplo, a una marcha o desfile.

Uno “cae en la trampa” (en inglés, falls for a trick or falls into a trap). La pintoresca expresión caer como un chorlito usa una palabra de origen vascuense, txorl(it)o “pajar(it)o”. Pero al descubrir o descifrar la verdad, uno “cae en la cuenta”, de lo que el inglés no tiene equivalente.

Entre el comienzo y el fin de nuestra vida cuando uno “cae muerto” (ingl, drops dead), el momento más dramático tal vez sea el enamoramiento: falling in love, literalmente “caer en amor”.

De nuevo nos encontramos frente a lo misterioso del verbo “caer”, to fall: pareciera nombrar una acción voluntaria (como “caminar”, “cocinar”), sin embargo lo que expresa es la operación sobre un cuerpo de una fuerza externa: el amor, la muerte, la gravedad.

Es difícil sondear toda la profundidad de este concepto para el lenguaje y la cultura. En la perspectiva cristiana, la fatal desobediencia de Adán y Eva en el Edén causa “la  Caída” (the Fall) de la Humanidad en un estado de pecado. Es más: la Caída puede entenderse como el marco para la totalidad de la historia humana.

                   ¡Buenas palabras! Good words!  

                             Pablo

Copyright  ©2016 by Pablo J. Davis.  Se reservan todos los derechos. Una anterior versión de este ensayo apareció originalmente en la edición del 11 al 17 de diciembre 2016 de La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee), como la entrega número 210 de la columna semanal bilingüe “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT es Traductor Certificado por la ATA (American Translators Association), inglés>español, e Intérprete Certificado por los Tribunales del Estado de Tennessee inglés<>español, además de entrenador en los campos de la traducción, interpretación y competencia transcultural. Es doctor en Historia de América Latina por la Universidad de Johns Hopkins, y actualmente candidato al Juris Doctor en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Memphis (mayo 2017).

Grammar and the “president elect”

Enlace para español/Link here for Spanish

Dear reader,

By the time these lines (written on Sunday) reach you, the election will be over—and all I can say is, I told you so. Which reminds me of the brilliant quip by St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Dizzy Dean who said, before the 1934 World Series against Detroit, “This Series is already won”—then added, “I just don´t know by which team.”

ballot-into-ballot-boxSo, as you read this, there will (presumably) be a president-elect. The term’s a bit odd: if a candidate is “elected,” why the form “elect”? (Spanish similarly has presidente electo where you might expect elegido.) The answer lies in the difference between “strong” and “weak” verbs in Germanic grammar, which is the main structure for how English works.

A weak verb forms the participle by adding an ending, typically “ed,” to the verb stem without changing the stem. Thus “bake” becomes “I had baked” and the participle can also act as an adjective: “baked chips.”

On the other hand, strong verbs like “seek,”  “sink,” and “bind” form irregular participles, short and punchy: “sought,” “sunk,” and “bound.” So, in English, the verb “elect,” while normally weak, in the phrase “president elect” behaves as a strong verb.

In Spanish, the equivalent principle derived from Latin grammar refers not to verbs, but rather to participles, as strong or weak.  Many verbs have both forms. Elegir (to elect or choose) yields me habían elegido (they had chosen me) in weak form, and presidente electo (president elect) in strong form, as an adjective. Habían freído las papas (they had fried the potatoes) but papas fritas (fried potatoes). Span. conquista and Engl. “conquest” both embody a strong form of verbs derived from Latin conquirere. Span. convencer gives convencido (convinced) but the strong form convicto (convicted); the English noun “convict” also derives from the strong form.

From “president elect” to “convict” in the same column—sadly, in 2016, regardless of who won, it doesn’t seem like such a big leap.

El presidente electo… ¿o elegido?

Link here for English/Enlace para inglés

Querida lectora o lector,

Para cuando estas líneas (escritas el domingo) le alcancen, las elecciones ya habrán concluído. Y salió todo tal como yo sabía. Lo que me recuerda a la feliz ocurrencia de Dizzy Dean, lanzador de los Cardenales de San Luís antes de la Serie Mundial de 1934 contra Detroit: “Esta serie ya está ganada”, sentenció—para luego agregar, “aunque no sé por cuál de los equipos”.

ballot-into-ballot-box

Así que, mientras usted lee esto, ya habrá un presidente electo, o presidenta electa (en inglés: president elect). Pero, ¿por qué decimos “electo/a” en vez de “elegido/a”? La respuesta está en la gramática de los participios.

El participio débil se forma agregando un sufijo, típicamente “ado” o “ido”, a la raíz del verbo. Así “habíamos visitado Colombia” o “he hablado con la directora”. En inglés el sufijo débil, por lo general, es -ed (I’ve always walked to work, “siempre he caminado al trabajo”).

El participio fuerte, en cambio, altera la raíz del verbo, que queda corto y rítmicamente fuerte: en inglés seek (buscar) deviene sought, bind (atar, encuadernar) deviene bound. (En la gramática germánica, que es la que predomina en inglés, no se habla de participios débiles y fuertes, como en la gramática derivada del latín, sino de verbos débiles y fuertes.)

En español muchos verbos tienen ambas formas (algunos verbos en inglés también, entre ellos elect). Así “elegir” da “me habían elegido” en forma débil y “presidente electo” o “presidente electa” en forma fuerte, adjetival. “He freído las papas” y “las papas ya están fritas”. El verbo latín conquirere dio el antiguo “conquerir” con participio débil “conquerido”. La forma fuerte “conquisto/conquista” lo suplantó, a tal punto que el infinitivo devino “conquistar.” “Convencer” en forma débil da “convencido” y en forma fuerte “convicto”.

De “electo” a “convicto” en una misma columna—por alguna razón, en este año 2016, no suena tan raro.

                   ¡Buenas palabras! Good words!

El doctor Pablo Julián Davis (pablo@laprensalatina.com),  Traductor Certificado (ATA) e Intérprete Certificado (Suprema Corte de Tennessee) con más de 25 años de experiencia, especializado en documentos legales y comerciales. www.interfluency.com

La palabra de los mil disfraces: la larga y extraña carrera de “freak”

Link here for English/Enlace para inglés

Querida lectora o lector,

Las palabras cambian a través de los años y generaciones—cambian de deletreo, de sonido y sobre todo de significado. Pero algunas recorren caminos tan largos, con tantas vueltas y sorpresas, que llegan a ser increíbles. Una de éstas la encontramos en inglés: la voz freak.

Circus poster photo, Ala., Walker Evans [1935] [AmMemory LOC id- fsa1998017988(slash)PP]

Una asociación fuerte de la palabra freak era con el circo, donde significaba una persona exhibida en razón de alguna característica inusual (a veces morbosa) como la estatura extrema, dedos demás en manos o pies, etc. La foto es de un afiche de circo en Alabama en 1935, por Walker Evans (fuente: Library of Congress, American Memory website).

Guerrero valiente o feroz. Esta acepción es antigua, se remonta al año 900 o antes.

Capricho, abrupto cambio de parecer.  Establecido ya en el siglo 19. “A sudden freak seemed to have seized him” (Pareció apoderarse de él un repentino capricho) (Jane Austen). Ya casi no se usa. Pero el verbo to freak out sigue siendo muy corriente—se refiere a un ataque de conducta muy nerviosa o irracional ante una situación.

Entusiasta, maniático.  Del capricho se pasó al entusiasmo. Es muy común aún oír decir, “She’s a health freak” (Es una maniática de la salud).

Fenómeno, anormal.  De la idea de capricho surgió la de lo fenomenal, lo raro.  Una persona muy alta, por ejemplo, puede ser tildado a freak ó a freak of nature (un fenómeno de la naturaleza). Allá por 1920 crecía el término circus freak—una persona (o animal) exhibida en el circo, las ferias o lo que en inglés se llama carnival y que poco tiene que ver con los festejos antes de la Cuaresma. Como ser “La mujer barbuda” o “La ternera de dos cabezas”.

Raro, inusual. Lindante con la acepción anterior, pero sutilmente distinta, es ésta: como adjetivo, freak  puede significar “raro, inusual”. Por ejemplo, se diría que una nevada en pleno verano es a freak snowstorm; o, de cualquier acontecimiento raro y con muy poca probabilidad de repetirse, a freak occurrence.

Drogadicto.  En los años 1960s y 1970s, se llamaba freak o hippie freak al amante de la droga, usualmente marihuana o LSD. Se asociaba, en el hombre, al pelo largo y la barba. The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers (Los Fabulosos y Peludos Hermanos Freak) era un cómic under de la época.

Ninfómana, persona hipersexualizada. Fue cediendo espacio el tema de la droga, ante un nuevo significado. Rick James, al cantar “Super freak, the girl’s a super freak” aludía a la presunta insaciabilidad sexual de una persona. En español está la palabra técnica ninfómana y sinnúmero de términos de slang, entre ellos loca, muy usada en este sentido en Argentina y Uruguay.

             ¡Buenas palabras! Good words!  

Copyright  ©2016 by Pablo J. Davis.  Se reservan todos los derechos. Una anterior versión de este ensayo apareció originalmente en la edición del 8 al 14 de mayo 2016 de La Prensa Latina(Memphis, Tennessee), como la entrega número 179 de la columna semanal bilingüe “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT es Traductor Certificado por la ATA (American Translators Association), inglés>español, e Intérprete Certificado por los Tribunales del Estado de Tennessee inglés<>español, además de entrenador en los campos de la traducción, interpretación y competencia transcultural. Es doctor en Historia de América Latina por la Universidad de Johns Hopkins, y actualmente candidato al Juris Doctor en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Memphis (mayo 2017).

Word of a thousand disguises: the long, strange career of “freak”

Enlace para español/Link here for Spanish

Dear reader,

Words change across years and generations. They change spelling, sound, and especially meaning. But some follow such long and winding paths, so full of surprises, it can be incredible. One of these is the English word “freak.”

Circus poster photo, Ala., Walker Evans [1935] [AmMemory LOC id- fsa1998017988(slash)PP]

A key association of “freak” is with the circus, where it meant a person displayed due to some unusual (even hideous) characteristic such as extreme height, extra fingers, etc. This photo of a circus poster was taken in Alabama in 1935 by Walker Evans. (Source: Library of Congress, American Memory website)

Brave, fierce warrior.  From Old English, this sense dates to A.D. 900 or before.

Sudden fancy, whim.  This use was well established by the early 19th century. “A sudden freak seemed to have seized him” (Jane Austen). Spanish equivalents: capricho, locura. Not much used anymore. But freak out is—meaning a highly nervous or irrational reaction to a situation: “I need you to stay calm—don’t freak out on me.”

Enthusiast.  From the sense of “whim” arose that of “enthusiast.” It’s still common to hear, “She’s a health freak.” Spanish: Es una maniática de la salud.

Abnormal or extreme specimen. From “whim” came, too, the idea of the abnormal. A very tall person could be called “a freak” or “a freak of nature.” Around 1920 the term “circus freak” began to grow in use. It referred to an unfortunate person or animal fated to be exhibited in a circus, fair, or carnival. Spanish has fenómeno del circo. Typical attractions might be “The Bearded Lady” or “The Two-Headed Calf.”

Unusual, odd, rare. Similar to the previous sense, but distinct, is this broader one: as an adjective, “freak” can simply mean “unusual, odd, rare.” For instance, “a freak early-summer snowstorm” or “a freak occurrence.”

Drug user. In the 1960s and 1970s, it was commonplace to hear “freak” for an enthusiastic drug user, usually of marijuana or LSD.  It was also associated, in men, with beards and long hair. The combination “hippie freak” was common. An underground comic of the era was The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers.

Nymphomaniac, hypersexual person. The drug-related sense began to give way to a new one. Rick James used it when he famously sang, “Super freak, the girl’s a super freak!” The meaning is that an individual is presumably insatiable in the sexual realm. Spanish has ninfómana and many slang terms, including loca (the feminine form of the adjective for “crazy”), much used in Argentina and Uruguay.

Copyright ©2016 by Pablo J. Davis.  All Rights Reserved. An earlier version of this essay originally appeared in the May 8-14, 2016 edition of La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee) as number 179 in the weekly bilingual column, “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT is an ATA (American Translators Association) Certified Translator, Engl>Span; a Tennessee State Courts Certified Interpreter, Engl<>Span; and an innovative trainer in the fields of translation, interpreting, and intercultural competency, with over 25 years experience. He holds the doctorate in Latin American History from The Johns Hopkins University, and is a Juris Doctor Candidate at the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, University of Memphis (May 2017).

%d bloggers like this: