Grammar and the “president elect”

Enlace para español/Link here for Spanish

Dear reader,

By the time these lines (written on Sunday) reach you, the election will be over—and all I can say is, I told you so. Which reminds me of the brilliant quip by St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Dizzy Dean who said, before the 1934 World Series against Detroit, “This Series is already won”—then added, “I just don´t know by which team.”

ballot-into-ballot-boxSo, as you read this, there will (presumably) be a president-elect. The term’s a bit odd: if a candidate is “elected,” why the form “elect”? (Spanish similarly has presidente electo where you might expect elegido.) The answer lies in the difference between “strong” and “weak” verbs in Germanic grammar, which is the main structure for how English works.

A weak verb forms the participle by adding an ending, typically “ed,” to the verb stem without changing the stem. Thus “bake” becomes “I had baked” and the participle can also act as an adjective: “baked chips.”

On the other hand, strong verbs like “seek,”  “sink,” and “bind” form irregular participles, short and punchy: “sought,” “sunk,” and “bound.” So, in English, the verb “elect,” while normally weak, in the phrase “president elect” behaves as a strong verb.

In Spanish, the equivalent principle derived from Latin grammar refers not to verbs, but rather to participles, as strong or weak.  Many verbs have both forms. Elegir (to elect or choose) yields me habían elegido (they had chosen me) in weak form, and presidente electo (president elect) in strong form, as an adjective. Habían freído las papas (they had fried the potatoes) but papas fritas (fried potatoes). Span. conquista and Engl. “conquest” both embody a strong form of verbs derived from Latin conquirere. Span. convencer gives convencido (convinced) but the strong form convicto (convicted); the English noun “convict” also derives from the strong form.

From “president elect” to “convict” in the same column—sadly, in 2016, regardless of who won, it doesn’t seem like such a big leap.

El presidente electo… ¿o elegido?

Link here for English/Enlace para inglés

Querida lectora o lector,

Para cuando estas líneas (escritas el domingo) le alcancen, las elecciones ya habrán concluído. Y salió todo tal como yo sabía. Lo que me recuerda a la feliz ocurrencia de Dizzy Dean, lanzador de los Cardenales de San Luís antes de la Serie Mundial de 1934 contra Detroit: “Esta serie ya está ganada”, sentenció—para luego agregar, “aunque no sé por cuál de los equipos”.

ballot-into-ballot-box

Así que, mientras usted lee esto, ya habrá un presidente electo, o presidenta electa (en inglés: president elect). Pero, ¿por qué decimos “electo/a” en vez de “elegido/a”? La respuesta está en la gramática de los participios.

El participio débil se forma agregando un sufijo, típicamente “ado” o “ido”, a la raíz del verbo. Así “habíamos visitado Colombia” o “he hablado con la directora”. En inglés el sufijo débil, por lo general, es -ed (I’ve always walked to work, “siempre he caminado al trabajo”).

El participio fuerte, en cambio, altera la raíz del verbo, que queda corto y rítmicamente fuerte: en inglés seek (buscar) deviene sought, bind (atar, encuadernar) deviene bound. (En la gramática germánica, que es la que predomina en inglés, no se habla de participios débiles y fuertes, como en la gramática derivada del latín, sino de verbos débiles y fuertes.)

En español muchos verbos tienen ambas formas (algunos verbos en inglés también, entre ellos elect). Así “elegir” da “me habían elegido” en forma débil y “presidente electo” o “presidente electa” en forma fuerte, adjetival. “He freído las papas” y “las papas ya están fritas”. El verbo latín conquirere dio el antiguo “conquerir” con participio débil “conquerido”. La forma fuerte “conquisto/conquista” lo suplantó, a tal punto que el infinitivo devino “conquistar.” “Convencer” en forma débil da “convencido” y en forma fuerte “convicto”.

De “electo” a “convicto” en una misma columna—por alguna razón, en este año 2016, no suena tan raro.

                   ¡Buenas palabras! Good words!

El doctor Pablo Julián Davis (pablo@laprensalatina.com),  Traductor Certificado (ATA) e Intérprete Certificado (Suprema Corte de Tennessee) con más de 25 años de experiencia, especializado en documentos legales y comerciales. www.interfluency.com

Word of a thousand disguises: the long, strange career of “freak”

Enlace para español/Link here for Spanish

Dear reader,

Words change across years and generations. They change spelling, sound, and especially meaning. But some follow such long and winding paths, so full of surprises, it can be incredible. One of these is the English word “freak.”

Circus poster photo, Ala., Walker Evans [1935] [AmMemory LOC id- fsa1998017988(slash)PP]

A key association of “freak” is with the circus, where it meant a person displayed due to some unusual (even hideous) characteristic such as extreme height, extra fingers, etc. This photo of a circus poster was taken in Alabama in 1935 by Walker Evans. (Source: Library of Congress, American Memory website)

Brave, fierce warrior.  From Old English, this sense dates to A.D. 900 or before.

Sudden fancy, whim.  This use was well established by the early 19th century. “A sudden freak seemed to have seized him” (Jane Austen). Spanish equivalents: capricho, locura. Not much used anymore. But freak out is—meaning a highly nervous or irrational reaction to a situation: “I need you to stay calm—don’t freak out on me.”

Enthusiast.  From the sense of “whim” arose that of “enthusiast.” It’s still common to hear, “She’s a health freak.” Spanish: Es una maniática de la salud.

Abnormal or extreme specimen. From “whim” came, too, the idea of the abnormal. A very tall person could be called “a freak” or “a freak of nature.” Around 1920 the term “circus freak” began to grow in use. It referred to an unfortunate person or animal fated to be exhibited in a circus, fair, or carnival. Spanish has fenómeno del circo. Typical attractions might be “The Bearded Lady” or “The Two-Headed Calf.”

Unusual, odd, rare. Similar to the previous sense, but distinct, is this broader one: as an adjective, “freak” can simply mean “unusual, odd, rare.” For instance, “a freak early-summer snowstorm” or “a freak occurrence.”

Drug user. In the 1960s and 1970s, it was commonplace to hear “freak” for an enthusiastic drug user, usually of marijuana or LSD.  It was also associated, in men, with beards and long hair. The combination “hippie freak” was common. An underground comic of the era was The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers.

Nymphomaniac, hypersexual person. The drug-related sense began to give way to a new one. Rick James used it when he famously sang, “Super freak, the girl’s a super freak!” The meaning is that an individual is presumably insatiable in the sexual realm. Spanish has ninfómana and many slang terms, including loca (the feminine form of the adjective for “crazy”), much used in Argentina and Uruguay.

Copyright ©2016 by Pablo J. Davis.  All Rights Reserved. An earlier version of this essay originally appeared in the May 8-14, 2016 edition of La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee) as number 179 in the weekly bilingual column, “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT is an ATA (American Translators Association) Certified Translator, Engl>Span; a Tennessee State Courts Certified Interpreter, Engl<>Span; and an innovative trainer in the fields of translation, interpreting, and intercultural competency, with over 25 years experience. He holds the doctorate in Latin American History from The Johns Hopkins University, and is a Juris Doctor Candidate at the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, University of Memphis (May 2017).

What good translation is “for”!

Enlace para español/Link here for Spanish

Dear reader,

 “Latinos para Trump” read signs at the GOP Convention. Clearly it meant “Latinos for Trump” but it didn’t say that: Spanish para can mean “for” but it’s not the same “for” used to indicate support of a candidate. (An even more unfortunate version of the sign, also seen at the convention, was  “Hispanics para Trump” which didn’t even use the Spanish word for “Hispanics”: hispanos.)

Latinos-Hispanics para Trump

Scenes from the Republican Convention held in Cleveland, Jul. 18-21, 2016.

The preposition para mainly means “for the purpose of, in order to, to be used by.” Papel para fotocopiadora, “paper for  photocopier, photocopy paper”; vegetales para ensaladas, “vegetables for salads, salad greens.”

“Latinos para Trump” says something like “Latinos to be used by Trump.” It should read: Latinos por (or con) Trump.

(We’ll revisit por/para again in the near future.)

The mistranslation unintentionally said some other things, too: “This sign was not made by a Latino” or (more accurately) “was not created by a native Spanish speaker.” Even worse: “We don’t care about Latinos, we just want their votes.”

Poor translation is poison: it undermines your message; makes you look foolish; and sends adverse signals—the worst being, “We don’t care enough to do this right.”

Every time an organization assigns a translation to some employee who “speaks Spanish,” the result will almost certainly be unfortunate—and maybe deadly: imagine the translation of a safety warning!

Few of us would let our brother-in-law “who fools around with electrical stuff” do the wiring of our house. Or have the neighbor who once took a CPR course operate on our liver. But, in essence, that’s what’s routinely done with translation (and its spoken cousin, interpreting). These are professional, technical skills requiring training and experience, not something you can do just because you (sort of) know a second language—and not even just from being bilingual.

¡”Por” algo hay que traducir bien!

Link here for English/Enlace para inglés

Querida lectora o lector,

“Latinos para Trump” rezaban los carteles en la Convención del Partido Republicano esta última semana. Obviamente debería haber sido “Latinos por Trump” o “Latinos con Trump”. Quien confeccionó el cartel no se dio cuenta de que “para” no es la traducción correcta de la preposición for en la frase en inglés, Latinos for Trump. (Otra versión del cartel que se vio por ahí era más desatinada aun: “Hispanics para Trump”!)

Latinos-Hispanics para Trump

Escenas de la Convención del Partido Republicano de EEUU, celebrada en Cleveland, Ohio del 18 al 21 de julio 2016.

El significado principal de “para” es “a fin de, destinado a, para consumo o uso de”. Así decimos “papel para fotocopiadora” ó “vegetales para ensalada”. “Latinos para Trump” entonces, es como si se dijera, “Latinos a ser usados por Trump”.

Sin querer, el error comunicó otras cosas también: “Quien hizo este cartel no es latino” ó (mejor dicho) “no es hispanohablante nativo”. Peor aun: “No nos importan los latinos, sólo queremos sus votos”.

La mala traducción es veneno. Socava el mensaje de uno, lo hace quedar como tonto y transmite señales poco afortunadas—sobre todo esta: “Esto no nos importa lo suficiente como para hacerlo bien”.

Cada vez que una organización le asigna una tarea de traducción a algún empleado sin otro antecedente ni calificación que el de (presuntamente) “hablar español”, el resultado casi seguro será embarazoso o peor.  Incluso, tal vez, fatal: imagine sin más el caso de la traducción de un manual de seguridad.

¿Quién dejaría que su cuñado que “hace pinitos en cosas de electricidad” haga el cableado de su casa? ¿O que el vecino que una vez tomó un curso de primeros auxilios le opere al hígado? Sin embargo, es lo que se hace frecuentemente con la traducción (y su contraparte oral, la interpretación). Se trata de destrezas profesionales, técnicas, que exigen estudio, capacitación y experiencia. No es algo que se pueda hacer sólo porque uno “más o menos” sabe un segundo idioma—ni aun, siquiera, por el hecho de ser bilingüe.

¡Buenas palabras! Good words!  

Pablo

Copyright  ©2016 by Pablo J. Davis.  Se reservan todos los derechos. Una anterior versión de este ensayo apareció originalmente en la edición del 31 julio al 6 agosto 2016 de La Prensa Latina(Memphis, Tennessee), como la entrega número 191 de la columna semanal bilingüe “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT es Traductor Certificado por la ATA (American Translators Association), inglés>español, e Intérprete Certificado por los Tribunales del Estado de Tennessee inglés<>español, además de entrenador en los campos de la traducción, interpretación y competencia transcultural. Es doctor en Historia de América Latina por la Universidad de Johns Hopkins, y actualmente candidato al Juris Doctor en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Memphis (mayo 2017).

The position must be filled

Enlace para español/Click here for Spanish

Dear reader,

We’re about to see two political conventions whose result may not be foreordained. Many find this strange, even unthinkable. But it’s how conventions used to be—before they became blockbuster TV specials with lots of flash but no real drama.

A bilingual look at some words of the season:

Roman white toga

“Candidate” comes from the Roman custom of those seeking public office wearing a white (candidum) toga, symbolizing purity. It’s unclear if this would make apt electoral attire today.

Convention, from Latin convenire “to come together.” Spanish convención has been widely used for such gatherings for some time; in the early/mid 20th century it surpassed an older term still not entirely obsolete: asamblea (assembly).

“Convention” can also mean a broadly accepted custom, as when broadcasters say a show starts at “9PM/8PM Central” it’s understood 9PM means Eastern time. Spanish “Convengamos en que…” (Let’s agree that) uses this sense of “convention.”

Span. convenio, from the same Latin root, means “agreement” as in an international treaty or a legal settlement.

Candidate and  candidato go back to a Roman custom: aspirants to public office wore white togas. Lat. candidum meant “white, pure.” Engl. “candid” took French’s sense “frank, sincere.” Span. cándido takes up a different sense: “naïve.” Neither “candid” nor cándido generally spring to mind when thinking of politicians.

Nominee. This sense is old in English, from at least the 1680s. The Spanish equivalent: candidato, simply, or titular (el titular del partido Republicano, the Republican Party nominee). A quaint term is “standard-bearer” (“standard” a term for “flag”); Span. has an equivalent, abanderado.

Running. Candidates “run” for office (or “stand” in the UK). In Spanish se postulan or se presentan, which are both also ways of saying “to apply”—as for a job. The electorate is a strange employer, though, as it is forced to hire someone even if not satisfied with the applicants.

¡Buenas palabras! Good words!

Pablo

Copyright ©2016 by Pablo J. Davis.  All Rights Reserved. An earlier version of this essay originally appeared in the Jul. 17-23, 2016 edition of La Prensa Latina (Memphis, Tennessee) as number 189 in the weekly bilingual column, “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT is an ATA (American Translators Association) Certified Translator, Engl>Span; a Tennessee State Courts Certified Interpreter, Engl<>Span; and an innovative trainer in the fields of translation, interpreting, and intercultural competency, with over 25 years experience. He holds the doctorate in Latin American History from The Johns Hopkins University, and is a Juris Doctor Candidate at the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, University of Memphis (May 2017).

Hay que contratar a alguien

Link here for English/Enlace para inglés

Querida lectora o lector,

Estamos a punto de ver dos convenciones poíticas cuyo resultado no está aún escrito. Para muchos esto es increíble, impensable. Pero es como solían ser las convenciones, antes de que devinieran grandes shows televisivos con mucho color pero sin drama. Una mirada bilingüe a algunos términos clave de la época:

Convención y convention (en inglés) vienen del latín convenire (juntarse). “Convención” desplazó, hará cosa de un siglo, a “asamblea” aunque este último término aún se usa.

Roman white toga

La palabra “candidato” viene de la costumbre romana de vestir los postulantes a cargos públicos toga blanca (candidum) que simbolizaba la pureza. No está claro si este atuendo sería apto para los candidatos poíticos hoy en día.

“Convención” también puede significar una costumbre general: por ejemplo, cuando la TV norteamericana anuncia que un show empieza a las “9, 8 Centro” se entiende que es a las 9:00 en la zona Este. “Convengamos en que…” recoge este sentido de “convenir”.

“Convenio” viene de la misma raíz en latín. Significa “acuerdo”, por ejemplo un tratado entre países, o la resolución de una disputa legal que evita ir a juicio.

Candidato y candidate aluden a la toga blanca vestida por los aspirantes a cargos públicos romanos: candidum significaba “blanco, puro”. Por influencia del francés, candid pasó a significar en inglés “franco, sincero”. En español, en cambio, “cándido” quiere decir “ingenuo”. Ni candid ni mucho menos “cándido” parecieran aplicarse demasiado a los políticos, particularmente los exitosos.

El titular o “candidato” que sale de la convención es el nominee en inglés, “quien fue nominado”. A veces se dice, pintoresca y un poco antiguadamente, “abanderado”. En inglés, de modo similar, existe el término standard-bearerstandard aquí significa “bandera, estandarte”.

Postularse o “presentarse” al cargo, se expresa en EEUU como to run (correr)—en inglés británico se dice to stand (pararse)—for election. El candidato se presenta para un puesto de trabajo. Pero el electorado es un extraño patrón: tiene que contratar a alguno de los postulantes, por más que no le convenza ninguno.

 ¡Buenas palabras! Good words!   

Copyright  ©2016 by Pablo J. Davis.  Se reservan todos los derechos. Una anterior versión de este ensayo apareció originalmente en la edición del 17 al 23 de julio de 2016 de La Prensa Latina(Memphis, Tennessee), como la entrega número 189 de la columna semanal bilingüe “Misterios y Engimas de la Traducción/Mysteries and Enigmas of Translation”.  Pablo Julián Davis, PhD, CT es Traductor Certificado por la ATA (American Translators Association), inglés>español, e Intérprete Certificado por los Tribunales del Estado de Tennessee inglés<>español, además de entrenador en los campos de la traducción, interpretación y competencia transcultural. Es doctor en Historia de América Latina por la Universidad de Johns Hopkins, y actualmente candidato al Juris Doctor en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Memphis (mayo 2017).

%d bloggers like this: